Behind the image / Johnny Tang

What’s the background of this image?

Landmines comes from a series I completed between 2010-2011 titled Senbazuru.

In Japan there is a tradition known as “Senbazuru” (literally 1000 cranes) that states, anyone who folds 1000 origami cranes will be granted a single wish by the gods. The cranes are usually strung together, and hung on the outer walls of a temple, where they slowly decay as they are exposed to the elements. It is believed that the sacrificed cranes will then carry the wish up to heaven, for the gods to receive.

I am an impatient American, so I decided to burn mine.

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Behind the Image / Luca Tombolini

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Between the 2 images from your last series, did you really waited in the desert for the sunset to come and the colors to change?

Yes that was it. The second is an early night shot which is possible to do when its full moon. I do it often but usually choose one of the two, but this time i had the feeling they could look well together if hanged next to each other.

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Behind the Image / Sebastian Forkarth

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Can you tell us more about these 2 images and your series ‘Safe Haven’ ?

The first picture shows two Peshmerga soldiers on a hill station outside Sulaymaniyah, the second largest town in the Autonomous Region of Kurdistan. I spend the day with two kurdish friends on the top of the mountain. Driving back we took the wrong street and ended up in this military zone.

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Behind the image / Danny Rowton

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Tell us more about these 2 images and your series?

Both shots, like almost all of my Nightshift series, were taken on Medium Format slide film. The Petrol Pumps image was a location I had driven past a few times, and knew it had potential, so I made a mental note of it and I thought about what would heighten the mood I wanted to convey. It had a sense of longing to it, of a calling and that the silence would be almost deafening in the right situation. I knew it had to be at night, on slide film, and I later realised it had to be foggy weather.

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Behind the Image / Matthew Dunne

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Tell us more about this image and your series “It’s Spring and I’m Alone” ?
One a weekday morning I was waiting for the train to go to work. I decided to walk to the other end of the station and came upon this random cake, barely touched and completely left alone from the night before. There was a beautiful light from sun rise, so I took the picture, as I felt there was something lonely and discarded about a Happy Birthday cake.

A few months later I uploaded the picture to social media, and a good friend called me. She told me that the cake had been given to her by a patient at the pharmacy that she works at. This patient had a bit of a crush on her and this gift was a bit too much, she didn’t want it. She left it at her work place and when she returned from her lunch break it had gone. Until I took a photo of it.

More generally, my series is about the feeling of abandonment and isolation – how they form and consume and give way. On my girlfriend’s birthday she flew away from Australia and I was upset, pissed off and forced to be alone. At the same time Spring was starting and colours were becoming beautiful and people were happy and alive. So in many ways those things made me feel worse – that the world was waking up and joyful, but that I felt like a funeral.

Towards the end of the series the images are more happy and playful, as my period of isolation was ending – after 5 months I left to join my girlfriend overseas.

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Matthew Dunne – 26, live in Cambridge, England now, but until last month Melbourne, Australia was his home.

Special Behind the Image / Sean Gilchrist

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Sean is a 20 years old photographer from Arizona who only uses film.
I asked him to describe a selection of his photographs with one or two sentences.

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Behind the Image / Joy Celine Asto

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Tell us more about this image
I took this photo in one of the last few Art Deco buildings in Manila, one of the spots my photographer friends and I typically go to shoot. There’s this one room I really like for its unusual shape and details, like this big window in the picture and a sun roof that gives it a nice natural lighting on sunny days. I eventually found out this room has a lot of history and even used to be rented by a popular actor for decades. Fortunately, I was able to take this shot before they closed it off for renovation into a small museum. I used my Pentax Espio 120 SW II loaded with an expired Kodak Gold 100, and turned on its date stamp function on purpose for my ongoing photo diary project.
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Joy Celine Asto – 29 years old photographer from Manila, Philippines.

Behind the Image / Tessa Bolsover

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Tell us more about this image
I took this photo a year ago while I was living in Redlands, a small town in Southern California. The whole day was very surreal – a couple friends and I drove deep into the desert to visit Salvation Mountain, an enormous handmade shrine in the middle of nowhere. When the sun began to set we drove home down a straight, flat road; the kind that wavers on the horizon like a hallucination no matter how long you’ve been driving. I was in the back seat fiddling with my camera when I looked up and saw smoke billowing from the side of the road. We slowed, turned our heads in unison, and drove on silently. We couldn’t tell what had happened, but for me this photo (made with a 35mm Canon Rebel Ti) retains the strange tension of that moment.
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Tessa Bolsover – 21 years old photographer based in Portland, Oregon.

Behind the Image / Chris Beecroft

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Tell us more about this image
This image spawned from two dear friends and I deciding to throw some swift plans together and drive four hours south of the city till we reached an ever-favourite Mountain range. We parked up in the darkness, made a quick  coffee to fuel us onwards and started on up the mountain!
It’s rather peculiar to climb a mountain in the dark. There’s very little clues as to what your walking amongst. We heard a few kangaroo’s skip off as we walked into their radar, bar that there was nothing. It’s only on the way back down that you often realise your walking trail was sitting right on the edge of a ridge.

It was about halfway up that we realised something magical was taking place. Once we had cleared the tree line we looked behind us and caught a glimpse of the most brilliant pink skyline. As we kept scaling the sunrise became ever more luminescent. Strangely it only ever got pinker and pinker, until we were flooded in bright, bubblegum pink and looking beyond at the range around us, the whole thing seemed some naturalistic Dr Suess wonderland! I snapped this photo on a Fujifilm X100 and I knew as I took it that it was a magical snap.
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Chris Beecroft, 22 years old photographer based in Perth, Australia

Behind the Image / Walther Le Kon

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Tell us more about this image

The picture was taken in 1996 at the crack of dawn during a millitary exercise. back in the days there has been a general conscription in germany. you could decide either to do social or millitary service. as i was a naiv young man looking for exitement, i have choosen the army service. at this time i was not interestet in photographie at all. i just took some random shots for the photo album. some months ago i found the negativs, scanned them and was quite surprised by the atmosphere.

from my todays perspective i see young men, still kids, playing war, exercising to kill. to imagine and empathise what war actually means to peoole is gross. FUCK ALL governments and filthy old men, that are sending there young men to war, just to make the next move on the global chessboard of economics and power!

Camera : Chinon 3001 Multifocus

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Walther Le Kon, 38 years old photographer based in Leipzig, Germany