Behind the Image / Newsha Naderzad

Tell us more about this image
Well, this photo is from a series called “Renton”.
Renton is a town I created, filled with characters and moments that when pieced together, represent what I feel, see, and hear when I think of the 1970’s in Midwest America. This is my attempt at wanting to experience a time in a town that no longer exists, simply because the time has passed. Each image is delicately planned and posed before being shot based on these fictional characters in my head.
_________
Newsha Naderzad – 27 years old, from California.

Behind the Image / Wayne Clough

What’s the background of this image?

(Re)view is inspired by a press photograph that captures a moment from what is now commonly described as ‘The Battle of Orgreave’. Taking place on 18th June 1984 in South Yorkshire, UK, this event saw a violent confrontation between police and picketing mineworkers and is considered to be the pivotal moment which altered the course of the UK miners’ strike 1984-85.

_________
Wayne Clough – British painter based in London

READ FULL POST >

Behind the image / Johnny Tang

What’s the background of this image?

Landmines comes from a series I completed between 2010-2011 titled Senbazuru.

In Japan there is a tradition known as “Senbazuru” (literally 1000 cranes) that states, anyone who folds 1000 origami cranes will be granted a single wish by the gods. The cranes are usually strung together, and hung on the outer walls of a temple, where they slowly decay as they are exposed to the elements. It is believed that the sacrificed cranes will then carry the wish up to heaven, for the gods to receive.

I am an impatient American, so I decided to burn mine.

READ FULL POST >

Behind the Image / Luca Tombolini

luca_tombolini_03_ls09_20

luca_tombolini_04_ls09_17

Between the 2 images from your last series, did you really waited in the desert for the sunset to come and the colors to change?

Yes that was it. The second is an early night shot which is possible to do when its full moon. I do it often but usually choose one of the two, but this time i had the feeling they could look well together if hanged next to each other.

READ FULL POST >

Behind the Image / Sebastian Forkarth

Safe_Haven_28

Can you tell us more about these 2 images and your series ‘Safe Haven’ ?

The first picture shows two Peshmerga soldiers on a hill station outside Sulaymaniyah, the second largest town in the Autonomous Region of Kurdistan. I spend the day with two kurdish friends on the top of the mountain. Driving back we took the wrong street and ended up in this military zone.

READ FULL POST >

Behind the image / Danny Rowton

NS3

Tell us more about these 2 images and your series?

Both shots, like almost all of my Nightshift series, were taken on Medium Format slide film. The Petrol Pumps image was a location I had driven past a few times, and knew it had potential, so I made a mental note of it and I thought about what would heighten the mood I wanted to convey. It had a sense of longing to it, of a calling and that the silence would be almost deafening in the right situation. I knew it had to be at night, on slide film, and I later realised it had to be foggy weather.

READ FULL POST >

Behind the Image / Matthew Dunne

1_1463

Tell us more about this image and your series “It’s Spring and I’m Alone” ?
One a weekday morning I was waiting for the train to go to work. I decided to walk to the other end of the station and came upon this random cake, barely touched and completely left alone from the night before. There was a beautiful light from sun rise, so I took the picture, as I felt there was something lonely and discarded about a Happy Birthday cake.

A few months later I uploaded the picture to social media, and a good friend called me. She told me that the cake had been given to her by a patient at the pharmacy that she works at. This patient had a bit of a crush on her and this gift was a bit too much, she didn’t want it. She left it at her work place and when she returned from her lunch break it had gone. Until I took a photo of it.

More generally, my series is about the feeling of abandonment and isolation – how they form and consume and give way. On my girlfriend’s birthday she flew away from Australia and I was upset, pissed off and forced to be alone. At the same time Spring was starting and colours were becoming beautiful and people were happy and alive. So in many ways those things made me feel worse – that the world was waking up and joyful, but that I felt like a funeral.

Towards the end of the series the images are more happy and playful, as my period of isolation was ending – after 5 months I left to join my girlfriend overseas.

_________
Matthew Dunne – 26, live in Cambridge, England now, but until last month Melbourne, Australia was his home.

Special Behind the Image / Sean Gilchrist

14572710314_25abe28b2c_k

Sean is a 20 years old photographer from Arizona who only uses film.
I asked him to describe a selection of his photographs with one or two sentences.

READ FULL POST >

Behind the Image / Joy Celine Asto

Joy_Celine_Asto

Tell us more about this image
I took this photo in one of the last few Art Deco buildings in Manila, one of the spots my photographer friends and I typically go to shoot. There’s this one room I really like for its unusual shape and details, like this big window in the picture and a sun roof that gives it a nice natural lighting on sunny days. I eventually found out this room has a lot of history and even used to be rented by a popular actor for decades. Fortunately, I was able to take this shot before they closed it off for renovation into a small museum. I used my Pentax Espio 120 SW II loaded with an expired Kodak Gold 100, and turned on its date stamp function on purpose for my ongoing photo diary project.
_________
Joy Celine Asto – 29 years old photographer from Manila, Philippines.

Behind the Image / Tessa Bolsover

tessa_bolsover

Tell us more about this image
I took this photo a year ago while I was living in Redlands, a small town in Southern California. The whole day was very surreal – a couple friends and I drove deep into the desert to visit Salvation Mountain, an enormous handmade shrine in the middle of nowhere. When the sun began to set we drove home down a straight, flat road; the kind that wavers on the horizon like a hallucination no matter how long you’ve been driving. I was in the back seat fiddling with my camera when I looked up and saw smoke billowing from the side of the road. We slowed, turned our heads in unison, and drove on silently. We couldn’t tell what had happened, but for me this photo (made with a 35mm Canon Rebel Ti) retains the strange tension of that moment.
_________
Tessa Bolsover – 21 years old photographer based in Portland, Oregon.